Table 3. Pharmaceutical Management of Latent Tuberculosis Infection58
MedicationDurationDoseFrequencyTotal Doses (n)
Isoniazid9 monthsAdults: 5 mg/kgDaily270
Children: 10–20 mg/kg*
Maximum dose: 300 mg
Adults: 15 mg/kgTwice weekly by DOT76
Children: 20–40 mg/kg*
Maximum dose: 900 mg
6 monthsAdult: 5 mg/kgDaily180
Children: Not recommended
Maximum dose: 300 mg
Adults: 15 mg/kgTwice weekly by DOT52
Children: Not recommended
Maximum dose: 900 mg
Isoniazid and rifapentine3 monthsAdults and children >12 years:Once weekly by DOT12
INH: 15 mg/kg rounded up to nearest 50 or 100 mg; 900 mg maximum
RPT:
  • 10.0–14.0 kg: 300 mg

  • 14.1–25.0 kg: 450 mg

  • 25.1–32.0 kg: 600 mg

  • 32.1–49.9 kg: 750 mg

  • ≥50 kg: 900 mg maximum

Rifampin4 monthsAdult: 10 mg/kgDaily120
Maximum dose: 600 mg
  • * The American Academy of Pediatrics recommended INH dosage.

  • INH is formulated as 100- and 300-mg tablets. RPT is formulated as 150-mg tablets in blister packs that should be kept sealed until use.

  • In the United States, the recommended latent tuberculosis infection treatment in children is a 9-month INH regimen. For latent tuberculosis infection treatment in infants, children, and adolescents when INH cannot be tolerated or the child has had contact with a patient infected with an INH-resistant but rifamycin-susceptible organism, the American Academy of Pediatrics recommends a 6-month daily rifampin dosage (180 dosages) of 10 to 20 mg/kg.

  • DOT, directly observed therapy; INH, isoniazid; RPT, rifapentine.